In film one, Middlemen explores Eric Garner’s case and how it relates to Quality of Life. We examine the policies that ultimately led to officers of the law committing such inhumane violence upon Mr. Garner.  We shine a light on law and law enforcement by specifically examining their decision making and what external and internal forces are dictating such decisions. Leaving the final “act” of the film to re-examine the Garner murder with this new information, all the while showing the community’s political response, will provide energy for the ending of the film and will deeply humanize Garner.

Film two investigates the Mohamed Bah story, a young man, unarmed, killed in his apartment after his mother Hawa Bah called 911 because of his depressive behavior.  We follow Mrs. Bah through the painful outcome of a non-criminal indictment to the conclusion of the civil trial where the NYPD speak openly about the events that led to Bah’s death. Multiple accounts of a similar nature are discussed in sit down interviews with the parents of Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, and Nicolas Heyward Jr. to aid in implicating the criminal justice system’s lack of accountability in police violence cases.

Film three is an analysis of the influences that have disquieted people of color through social control methods harvested within law and policy.  Our main character for the final film is Sekou Kambui, an organizer in the Black Liberation Movement, who served 47 years in prison after he became a target of COINTEL.  Supporting interviewees share their stories of to discuss the consequence of stereotypes, media’s influence on police decision making, and its impact on public perception of people of color. It becomes apparent that injustice is a devastating cycle played out in policy and law, amplified even further by numbers-driven policing.  It becomes apparent that injustice is a devastating cycle played out in policy and law, amplified even further by numbers-driven policing.

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